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The Value of Rhode Island Forests

A project of the Rhode Island Forest Conservation Advisory and the Rhode Island Tree Council

  • Kids hiking
    READ THE STUDY
    The Value of Rhode Island Forests
    (photo courtesy of Audubon Society of Rhode Island)

Rhode Island’s forests and trees may seem like a green backdrop to our state landscape, but they are in fact hard at work generating a wide range of services and values. We depend on forests for the clean air we breathe and the wood we use. Forests are a place where humans and native wildlife can live and thrive by providing habitats for animals and livelihoods for humans. They also offer watershed protection, prevent soil erosion and mitigate climate change. Forest conservation brings economic benefits to Rhode Island cities and towns. The forest and wood products sector generated nearly 2,500 jobs with $408 million in gross sales in 2016, while forest-based outdoor recreation contributes over $720 million annually to Rhode Island’s economy. Funded by a grant from the US Forest Service, this report outlines the benefits Rhode Island’s forests provide and offers a range of potential strategies to encourage forest conservation.

 
Read/Download the Study
Division of Forest Environment
TeeJay Boudreau, Deputy Chief
235 Promenade Street, Suite 394
Providence, RI 02908-5767
Phone: (401) 222-2445
Fax: (401) 222-2444